Channels Upper Providence Township April 2, 2018 Upper Providence Board of Supervisors

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AGENDA
UPPER PROVIDENCE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
TOWNSHIP RECREATION CENTER – 499 HOPWOOD ROAD
MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2018 – 7:00 P.M.
CALL TO ORDER
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
EXECUTIVE SESSION REPORT
APPROVAL OF BILL LIST:
1. March 13, 2018 to March 28, 2018: $ 829,870.59 (Page 3)
APPROVAL OF MINUTES:
2. March 19, 2018 Meeting (Page 14)
PUBLIC COMMENT (The Board will hear from any interested resident or taxpayer who
would like to comment on an item not on this evening’s agenda. Respondents are asked to
keep their comments to 3 minutes).
PUBLIC HEARING: None
OLD BUSINESS (ACTION/DISCUSSION ITEMS):
3. Consider adoption of Resolution 2018-24 to approve a 15% commitment of funds in the
amount of $86,100 for the acquisition of an agricultural conservation easement on the 44-acre
DuHovis farm located at 115 Wartman Road in the Township’s northern quadrant. (Page 22).
4. Consider nominations to fill vacancy on the Township Agricultural Security Act (ASA)
Committee.
NEW BUSINESS (ACTION/DISCUSSION ITEMS):
5. Consider adoption of Ordinance #571 to approve an amendment to Chapter 169 (Vehicles
and Traffic) authorizing a speed limit reduction from 45 mph to 40 mph on Linfield-Trappe
Road between Township Line Road and Main Street. (Page 24)
6. Consider action to reaffirm the Upper Providence Township Emergency Operations Plan.
(Page 25)
7. Discuss the potential for rezoning and development of a 10+ acre parcel at the intersection of
Hopwood Road and Route 29 (Collegeville Road)
MANAGER AND DEPARTMENT HEAD REPORTS
8. Capacity Rights Agreement for 322 Rittenhouse Road (1 EDU) (Page 54)
9. Capacity Rights Agreement for 1051 S. Lewis Road (1EDU) (Page 59)
10. Police Report
11. Recreation Report
12. Manager Highlights
CONSULTANT REPORTS:
13. Sanitary Sewer Force Main Relocation on Second Avenue (Township Engineer) (Page 64)
SOLICITOR’S REPORT:
SUPERVISORS COMMENTS
14. Reminder of Wednesday, April 4, 2018 Special BOS Meeting to receive Staff’s preliminary
recommendations for fire and ambulance services in Upper Providence Township. Note that
the meeting will start at 7:00 at Black Rock Fire Company’s Oaks Station, located at 260
Green Tree Road.
ADJOURNMENT
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UPPER PROVIDENCE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2018 – 7:00 P.M.
ATTENDANCE:
Board of Supervisors: John Pearson, Chairman; Albert Vagnozzi, Vice Chairman; Philip Barker,
Supervisor; Helene Calci, Supervisor; and Laurie Higgins, Supervisor.
Staff Present: Timothy J. Tieperman, Township Manager; Bryan Bortnichak, Assistant
Township Manager; Mark A. Toomey, Chief of Police; Richard Livergood, Director of Finance
and Administration; and Geoff Grace, Director of Planning and Zoning.
Consultants Present: Joseph Bresnan, Township Solicitor; Ken O’Brien, Traffic Engineer; and
William Dingman, Township Engineer.
Chairman Pearson opened the meeting with a short story entitled Two Monks.
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
Chairman Pearson asked everyone to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance.
EXECUTIVE SESSION: None
APPROVAL OF BILL LIST:
1. March 1, 2018 to March 12, 2018: $ 556,099.13
Ms. Higgins motioned, seconded by Ms. Calci, to approve the bill list from March 1, 2018
to March 12, 2018 in the amount of $556,099.13. The motion passed unanimously 5-0.
APPROVAL OF MINUTES:
2. March 19, 2018 Meeting Minutes
Mr. Vagnozzi motioned, seconded by Ms. Calci, to approve the March 5, 2018 Meeting
Minutes. The motion passed 5-0.
PUBLIC COMMENT:
Arthur Lebofsky (408 Peters Way) asked the Board to reconsider issuing a statement
protecting the environment from federal changes in the Environmental Protection Agency,
including the Clean Water Act. Mr. Pearson said he was in favor of the issue and asked if the
prior Board had acted on this request. Mr. Lebofsky said they were respectful and listened but
did not issue a statement. Mr. Lebofsky also asked for an update from the EMS subcommittee.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 14 of 70
PUBLIC HEARING: None
OLD BUSINESS (ACTION/DISCUSSION ITEMS):
3. Consider adoption of Resolution 2018-24 to approve a 15% commitment of funds in the
amount of $86,100 for the acquisition of an agricultural conservation easement on the 44-
acre DuHovis farm located at 115 Wartman Road in the Township’s northern quadrant.
Mr. Bresnan said that an agricultural deed restriction is a solid legal document which
cannot be reversed. Mr. Tieperman said there are no issues with funding the 15% matching
funds, which will come out of the Open Space Fund, the balance of which is around $1.2 million.
Ms. Danielle Weiden (Montgomery County Planning Commission) gave a description of
the benefits of the deed restriction. She said the public will have access to the farm market. She
said keeping this land agricultural will have less of an impact on the infrastructure. She said they
will continue paying taxes since it will still be privately owned.
Mr. Barker expressed concern that the supporting documentation on the Agricultural
Security Area hasn’t been updated since 1996 and is very out-of-date. Ms. Weiden said the
document should be reproduced every seven years, but it is the Township’s responsibility to
update the documents. Mr. Barker said he serves on the Township’s Agricultural Security Area
(ASA) Committee, which meets every time there is a property proposed for inclusion in the
ASA.
Mr. Barker said he is not opposed to the easement but wants reassurance that the
Township would retain leverage over the property should the easement ever be reversed in the
future. Mr. Pearson said he is unaware of such an easement ever being reversed. Mr. Barker
agreed, but indicated it has never been tested. Mr. Bresnan said the Township will own part of
the restriction. Ms. Weiden said the Commonwealth would never allow the deed restriction to be
lifted for development.
Mr. Pearson said it is a benefit to keep this property as open space and not to have it
developed. Mr. Vagnozzi questioned if an easement could be granted for sewers. Mr. Bresnan
said that would not be an issue. Ms. Calci added it is still their land.
Mr. Vagnozzi questioned what happens in the future if the property becomes
unsustainable. Ms. Weiden said the Planning Commission or Conservation District inspects
these types of properties on a regular basis to make sure the restrictions are being followed and
that the property retains an agricultural use. If not, they try and find ways to get it back into
production and provide assistance through the Conservation District.
The Board tabled this item to get answers to Mr. Barker’s question. It will be on the next
agenda for action consideration.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 15 of 70
4. Consider adoption of Resolution 2018-21 authorizing a joint Multimodal
Transportation Fund Grant Application to be used for improvements along the Lewis
Road corridor in Limerick Township, Royersford Borough and Upper Providence
Township. (Limerick Township is coordinating application process on behalf the three
municipalities).
Mr. Tieperman said this application is a resubmittal. He said Limerick is the lead
municipality to try and get a sidewalk project funded along the Spring Ford School District
properties. He said the improvements are primarily located in Royersford and Limerick, but
Upper Providence has a small portion. Upper Providence’s 30% match of that portion is
$6,957.30. When asked why the grant was turned down prior, Mr. Ken O’Brien (Township
Traffic Engineer) said these types of grants are highly competitive.
Mr. Lebofsky (408 Peters Way) questioned which agency funds these multimodal grants.
Mr. O’Brien said they are funded by the Commonwealth.
Mr. Vagnozzi motioned, seconded Ms. Calci, to adopt Resolution 2018-21 authorizing a
joint Multimodal Transportation Fund Grant Application to be used for improvements along the
Lewis Road corridor in Limerick Township, Royersford Borough and Upper Providence
Township with a Township match in the amount of $6,957.30. The motion passed unanimously
5-0
NEW BUSINESS (ACTION/DISCUSSION ITEMS):
5. Consider adoption of Resolution 2018-23 authorizing a waiver of land development for
the Cirque Du Soleil event to be located in the 422 Retail Center near the Expo Center in
front of The Dump. (Performances planned from July 11, 2018 through August 26, 2018).
Ms. Bernadette Kearney, on behalf of the applicant, gave a brief presentation on the
waiver of land development for the Cirque Du Soleil event to be held this July - August. She
said the applicant will work with the Township as specified in the review letters and offer $5,000
to cover professional review costs. She said Cirque Du Soleil is a professional organization and
cleans up the tent thoroughly after each performance.
Mr. Pearson asked if Audubon Land Development will comply with all review letters.
He also questioned if the improvements are going to be permanent improvements. Mr. Brad
Macy gave a brief overview of the layout and improvements.
Mr. Vagnozzi said that when the prior Board met with Cirque Du Soleil, they favored this
area because of the sewers, electric, and free parking. Mr. Macy added the location is right off of
Rt. 422 and has an educated, young population. He said the show will generate $23 - $28
million in revenue in two months, and a portion will go to Upper Providence.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 16 of 70
Mr. Vagnozzi questioned the traffic generated by the shows. He wants to make sure
there will be sufficient signage to direct traffic efficiently to the event site. Mr. Macy compared
the amount of traffic generated to a ball game or any large event. Chief Toomey said that
pedestrian safety and traffic safety were discussed and there is an adequate plan in place. He
said there are some minor issues but that heir plan was professionally done.
Mr. Pearson questioned which events are going on at the Expo Center while this event is
occurring. Mr. Macy said that no large scale shows will occur during the time of Cirque Du
Soleil. He said he believes there are some smaller shows planned. He added that they have
different peak hours. He said the Expo shows are during the day and that the Cirque Du Soleil
shows are at night.
Mr. Bresnan said that in addressing the Land Development issue, Staff generally agreed
that this temporary event does not constitute land development since the project entails minor
paving and the circus is temporary in nature.
Frank Vibbert (135 Sloan Road) asked if they are going to allow access off of Mill Road
under the Route 422 Bridge. He asked if landscaping could be considered a permanent structure.
Also he said the trailers have finally been removed but that the area still has not been improved.
He said the shows are going to be temporary, after which the residents will have to look at the
aftermath. Mr. Grace said they agreed to install temporary landscape islands at a later date. He
said the plan is to develop the area but that with this specific event, they are in a time crunch
with the deadline of the shows.
Mr. Vagnozzi motioned, seconded by Ms. Calci, to adopt Resolution 2018-23 authorizing
a waiver of land development for the Cirque Du Soleil event to be located in the 422 Retail
Center near the Expo Center in front of The Dump. The motion passed unanimously 5-0.
6. Consider adoption of Resolution 2018-25 authorizing the Township Manager to execute
all documents and agreements between Upper Providence Township and the Pennsylvania
Department of Transportation related to the 2018 Multimodal Transportation Fund Grant
Application seeking $927,000 for the Mont Clare Improvement Project.
Mr. Ken O’Brien said the Township has gone after this grant last year but was
unsuccessful. He said the project would realign the offset signal in Mont Clare and will also
align Jacobs and Mont Clare Streets. He noted the Township has also procured the property and
razed an existing building, which will serve as the Township’s matching portion.
Mr. O’Brien affirmed this grant allows the Township to account for monies already
spent on this intersection. He also recommends the Township spend an additional $73,000 for
the design, which will make the match 50% as opposed to the required 30% . This should make
the grant more competitive. This is the Township’s third time applying to the grant. He said
they have reached out and have a lot of political support for this application. Mr. Pearson said he
would like to be involved in the political outreach.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 17 of 70
Mr. Lebofsky (408 Peters Way) asked if there will be turn lanes at the improved
intersection. Mr. O’Brien said that, due to the close proximity of the neighborhood, they cannot
include turn lanes. He does think aligning this intersection will allow for more green time to
help with traffic.
Mr. Lebofsky questioned when the “S” curve on Rt. 29 was going to get fixed. Mr.
O’Brien said they are trying to fix one problem at a time. Mr. Vagnozzi said that when
Township representatives met with the Secretary of Transportation two years ago, she said that
major new, capacity-based infrastructure projects are a low priority for grant funding.
Don Lebedynsky (109 Jacobs) asked what they plan on doing with the section of Jacobs
Street which is in current use. Mr. O’Brien said the discussion has been to accommodate some
parking.
Kathy Pencak (109 Jacobs Street) asked about the houses with on street parking if there
will still be parking there. She also asked if there would be a staggered light so people have a
chance to turn. Mr. O’Brien said at this point the design is conceptual and they might have to
eliminate parking from the road itself. He said that is why they would be adding additional
parking on Jacobs Street. He also said they would have to coordinate the timing of the light with
PennDOT.
Mr. Vagnozzi motioned, seconded by Ms. Calci, to adopt Resolution 2018-25 authorizing
the Township Manager to execute all documents and agreements between Upper Providence
Township and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation related to the 2018 Multimodal
Transportation Fund Grant Application seeking $927,000 for the Mont Clare Improvement
Project. The motion passed unanimously 5-0.
7. Consider adoption of Resolution 2018-26 to authorize the submission of a $250,000
Greenway, Trails and Recreation Grant for the construction of the Schuylkill Trail East
Pedestrian Trail linking Montgomery County’s Upper Schuylkill Valley and Schuylkill
Canal Parks. (This is a joint application between Upper Providence and Montgomery
County)
Mr. Bill Dingman (Township Engineer) explained this is a new project initiative which is
currently in the permitting phase. He said the County approached the Township first and have
set aside some capital funds. He said that there is a path there today that is irregularly
maintained. The trail would also allow equipment access to the sewer authority.
Ms. Calci motioned, seconded by Mr. Vagnozzi, to adopt Resolution 2018-26 to authorize the
submission of a $250,000 Greenway, Trails and Recreation Grant for the construction of the Schuylkill
Trail East Pedestrian Trail linking Montgomery County’s Upper Schuylkill Valley and Schuylkill Canal
Parks. The motion passed unanimously 5-0.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 18 of 70
MANAGER AND DEPARTMENT HEAD REPORTS:
8. Finance Report
Mr. Richard Livergood gave an overview of the audit with Mallie. He said everything
went well, and they are working on finalizing it. He also gave a brief presentation of the
unaudited 2017 revenue and expense summaries.
9. Public Works
Mr. Tieperman said he excused Mr. Broadbelt from his report due to preparations for the
impending Nor’easter.
10. Planning and Zoning Report
Mr. Grace said the Spares Lane Subdivision received an affirmative recommendation
from the Planning Commission at its March 12th meeting. He said the project is tentatively
scheduled for the April 2, 2018 Board of Supervisors meeting.
The Planning Commission also has a tentative application for Silver Rhino for a
subdivision at Yerkes/Hopwood and Rt. 29. Mr. Pearson asked if they have looked at the traffic
in that intersection. Mr. Grace said the Traffic Engineer is aware of the traffic control needs at
the location.
Mr. Grace said the Zoning Hearing Board granted a sign variance for both Starbucks and
Upper Providence Equities. He said Verizon, Wawa, SEI North Campus are still pending. The
applicant for the Cellco Wireless cell tower has closed their case and is now at the public
comment stage.
Finally, Mr. Grace said he has also started to look at preliminary updates to the
Township’s Master Trail Plan.
11. Manager Highlights
Mr. Tieperman gave a brief description of some selected Manager Highlights:
• He updated the Board on preparations for the Board’s Special April 4, 2018
meeting on Fire/EMS issues.
• He said they were able to get in contact with the Montgomery County Prison
Warden to have DUI offenders do community service and clean-up along various
littered roads throughout the Township.
• He said they are currently finalizing demolition specifications of two properties
on Linfield Trappe Road. Ms. Higgins questioned if the demolition would be in
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 19 of 70
fall and asked if there are pictures of the property. Mr. Bortnichak said
realistically it would occur in about 5 months. Mr. Barker said there are pictures
of the property available for Supervisors’ review.
CONSULTANT REPORTS: None
SOLICITOR’S REPORT:
Mr. Bresnan said he had updated the Board on two pending litigation matters. He said
there are positive developments on each of them. He will have updates on these cases shortly.
SUPERVISOR’S COMMENTS:
Mr. Vagnozzi said over the past two years he has been on the Board, there has been a
goals retreat where the Board met with Staff to make sure all were on the same page. He
wishes to have such a retreat in the near future. Ms. Calci said that she agrees with Mr.
Vagnozzi and thinks it is something to consider after the April 4th Fire and EMS Special
Meeting. Mr. Tieperman said that if they can forward their goals to him, he can start
developing a draft consensus document for the Board’s review at a future meeting. Mr.
Pearson said that he agrees the Board should deliberate on goals but that they need to put the
Fire/EMS issues behind them first.
12. Reminder of Wednesday, April 4, 2018 Special BOS Meeting to receive Staff’s
preliminary recommendations for fire and ambulance services in Upper Providence
Township.
Mr. Vagnozzi said the April 4th Meeting will be a presentation by staff. He said he does
not want to see a harsh debate and will not participate in one. He said he is looking forward to
a presentation and highlights. Mr. Pearson said he is not looking for any confrontation either
and and hopes the residents will be happy with the outcome.
Other Public Comments
John Malec (187 Spares Lane) voiced concerns on the Spares Lane project. Mr. Grace
said the applicant will tentatively be on the agenda for the April 2, 2018 meeting. Mr. Pearson
said to check the website to make sure it is on the agenda.
George Malec (187 Spares Lane) followed up to John Malec’s comment. He expressed
concerns about inadequate widening, stating the current road is not large enough to have two
cars.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 20 of 70
ADJOURNMENT
Mr. Vagnozzi motioned, seconded by Ms. Calci, to adjourn the meeting. The motion
passed unanimously 5-0. The Board adjourned at approximately 8:48 p.m.
Respectfully Submitted,
______________________________
Timothy J. Tieperman
Township Manager/Secretary
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 21 of 70
UPPER PROVIDENCE TOWNSHIP
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA
RESOLUTION NO. 2018-24
COMMITMENT OF FUNDS FOR AN AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION
EASEMENT ON A TOWNSHIP FARM
WHEREAS, Francis and Ann Duhovis, who own a 44-acre farm at 115 Wartman Road
in Upper Providence Township has applied to the Montgomery County Agricultural Land
Preservation Board (Farm Board) to sell an agricultural conservation easement; and
WHEREAS, the Farm Board has chosen the Duhovis farm as a priority for farmland
preservation, then completed an appraisal to determine the agricultural easement value of this
farm, which is the maximum offer allowed; and
WHEREAS, Act 138 of 1998 amends the Agricultural Area Security Law to allow a
municipality to be a partner in holding an agricultural conservation easement; and
WHEREAS, the Board of Supervisors of Upper Providence Township has been notified
that this farm may become permanently preserved for agriculture by the Farm Board and that the
Township may contribute funding to the easement according to Act 138; and
WHEREAS, the County Farm Board is responsible for all steps in the procedure to
finalize preservation of this farm; and
WHEREAS, the Township acknowledges that when the owner receives a formal offer
from the Farm Board, the owner has the option to reject it, in which case any township financial
commitment may be withdrawn by the township,
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Supervisors of Upper
Providence Township that it hereby agrees to contribute 15% of the agricultural conservation
easement purchase price which is $86,100 on the Duhovis farm in Upper Providence
Township; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that upon passage of this resolution, the Farm Board
may send a formal written offer to the owner, including the township contribution named in this
resolution.
APPROVED by the Upper Providence Township Board of Supervisors on March 19, 2018.
By:
John F. Pearson, Chairman
Attest:
Timothy J. Tieperman, Township Manager/Secretary
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 22 of 70
COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA :
: SS.
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY :
On this, the _______ day of _________________, 2016, before me, the undersigned
officer, a Notary Public, personally appeared ________________, who acknowledged himself to
be the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of _____________________ Township, and that
he as such officer, being authorized to do so, executed the foregoing instrument for the purposes
therein contained.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and official seal.
Notary Public
My Commission expires:
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 23 of 70
UPPER PROVIDENCE TOWNSHIP
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA
ORDINANCE NUMBER 571
AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWNSHIP OF UPPER PROVIDENCE REDUCING THE SPEED LIMIT ON LINFIELDTRAPPE
ROAD BETWEEN MAIN STREET AND TOWNSHIP LINE ROAD FROM 45 MPH TO 40 MPH,
CODIFIED ORDINANCE SECTION 169-40 (SCHEDULE OF SPEED LIMITS); LEAVING THE REMAINDER OF
THE ORDINANCE IN FULL FORCE AND EFFECT; EFFECTIVE FIVE DAYS AFTER ADOPTION
WHEREAS, Upper Providence Township has received notification from the Department of
Transportation that in response to a request from the Township, it performed a traffic study upon
Linfield-Trappe Road and as a result thereof authorizes a reduction in the speed limit from 45 mph to 40
mph between Main Street and Township Line Road,
NOW THEREFORE,
Codified Ordinance 169-40, “Schedule I: Speed Limits” is amended by the addition of the
following to the schedule:
Name of Street Speed Limit Location
Linfield-Trappe Rd. 40 mph Township Line Rd. to Main St., both directions.
SR 4017 from SR 4014 to SR 4031)
The remainder of Ordinance 169-40 remains in full force and effect, unaffected by this
Ordinance. PennDOT will undertake posting in conformity with this Ordinance.
Effective five days after adoption.
SO ORDAINED this 2nd day of April, 2018.
_____________________________________
John F. Pearson, Board Chairman
Attest: ______________________________
Timothy J. Tieperman, Secretary
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 24 of 70
Township of Upper Providence
All Hazard Plan
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
BASIC EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN
1286 Black Rock Road
P.O. Box 406
Oaks, Pa 19456
WWW.uprov-montco.org
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 25 of 70
Royersford Borough Royersford Borough Royersford Borough
Limerick Township Limerick Township Limerick Township
Perkiomen Township Perkiomen Township Perkiomen Township
Trappe Borough Trappe Borough Trappe Borough
Collegeville Borough Collegeville Borough Collegeville Borough
Lower Providence Township Lower Providence Township Lower Providence Township
CHESTER COUNTY CHESTER COUNTY
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April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 26 of 70
TOWNSHIP OF UPPER PROVIDENCE
EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN
PROMULGATION

The primary role of Township of Upper Providence government is to provide for the Safety and welfare of its
citizens. The safety and welfare of our citizens are never more threatened than during disasters; man-made or
natural. The goal of emergency management is to ensure that mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery
actions transpire to a point that the public safety and welfare is preserved with the utmost responsibility.
The Township of Upper Providence Emergency Operations Plan provides a comprehensive framework for
township-wide emergency management. It addresses the roles and responsibilities of government organizations
and provides a cooperation for local, State, Federal, and private organizations and resources that may be
activated to address disasters and emergencies in the Township of Upper Providence.
The Township of Upper Providence Emergency Operations Plan ensures consistency with current policy
guidance and describes the interrelationship with other levels of government. The plan will continue to evolve,
responding to lessons learned from the actual disaster, and emergency experiences, ongoing planning efforts,
training, and Federal guidance.
Therefore, in recognition of the emergency management responsibilities as part of the Township of Upper
Providence government and with the authority vested in the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors for the
Township of Upper Providence, I hereby promulgate the Township of Upper Providence Emergency
Operations Plan.
____________________________________
John Pearson
Chairman, of the Township of Upper Providence Township
Board of Supervisors
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 27 of 70
Approval and Implementation
This plan supersedes any other Emergency Operation Plan dated Before April of 2018.
The transfer of management authority for actions during an incident is done through the execution of a written
delegation of authority from an agency to the chain of succession listed below. This procedure facilitates the
transition between incident management levels. The delegation of authority is a part of the briefing package
provided to an incoming incident management team. It should contain both the delegation of authority and
specific limitations to that authority.
The Township of Upper Providence Emergency Operations Plan delegates the Board of Supervisor’s authority
to specific individuals if he or she is unavailable. The chain of succession in a major emergency or disaster is
as follows:
1. The Township of Upper Providence Emergency Management Coordinator.
2. The Township of Upper Providence Assistant Emergency Management Coordinator.
3. The Township of Upper Providence Chief of Police or Fire Marshal.
__________________
Date
____________________________________
John Pearson, Chairman
Township of Upper Providence Township Board of Supervisors
Record of Change
CERTIFICATION OF REVIEW
Comment [P1]: This section has not been
approved.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 28 of 70
Change # Date of
Change
Entered
by
Date
Posted
Notes
1 09/18/16 R Ressel 09/18/16 Changed Twp. LOGO
2 01/30/18 R Ressel 01/30/18 Change in Twp. Supervisors
Record of Distribution
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 29 of 70
Group Agency/Department Title of
Recipient
How Distributed
(electronic or hard-copy)
Basic Emergency Operations Plan
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 30 of 70
Table of Contents
Section Page

Township of Upper Providence Map 2
Promulgation 3
Approval and Implementation 4
Record of Changes/Updates 5
Record of Distribution 6
Table of Contents 7
I. Purpose and Scope 8
II. Situation and Assumptions 9
III. Concepts of Operations and Continuity of Government 12
IV. Organization and Responsibilities 14
V. Training and Exercises 18
VI. Administration and Logistics 19
VII. Plan Requirements, Maintenance 20
Appendices:
Appendix A, Authorities, and References 21
Appendix B, Definitions, and Glossary 22

Annexes:
Emergency Support Functions Annexes. Under Separate Cover
Support Annexes. Under Separate Cover
Hazard, Threat, and Incident-Specific Annexes Under Separate Cover
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 31 of 70
I. PURPOSE AND SCOPE
Purpose
The purpose of this plan is to prescribe activities to be taken by the municipal government and other
community officials to protect the lives and property of the citizens. In the event of a natural or human-caused,
including terrorism, emergency or disaster, and to satisfy the requirements of the Pennsylvania Emergency
Management Services Code, (35 Pa. C.S. Section 7101 et seq., as amended,) to have a disaster emergency
management plan for the municipality.
The plan consists of a basic plan, which describes principles and doctrine; a notification and resource manual,
which provides listings and means of contacting needed resources; and a series of functional checklists which
provide detail for the accomplishment of the specifics of the operation.
Scope
The scope of the plan includes all activities in the entire emergency management cycle, including prevention,
preparedness, response, and recovery phases. This plan applies to all response organizations acting for or on
behalf of the government or citizens of the Township of Upper Providence, Montgomery County,
Pennsylvania. “Incident Specific Plans” may augment this plan, if necessary, to more efficiently cope with
special requirements presented by specific hazards.
Comment [P2]: This section has not been
approved.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 32 of 70
II. SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS
Situation
A. The Township of Upper Providence is located in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The population is
approximately 21,219 as of 2010. Terrain features that affect an emergency response include but not
limited to;
a) The Schuylkill River.
b) The Perkiomen Creek and several smaller streams/creeks.
c) Industrial areas.
d) Limited access roadways.
e) Heavy Traffic Volumes.
B. Following special facilities are indicated in the Notification and Resource Manual (NARM) section of the
Emergency Operations Plan (EOP):
1) CRITICAL FACILITIES
a) Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
b) Alternate EOC
c) Emergency Shelters/Warming Centers
d) Logistics Commodities Point of Distribution (POD)s
e) Pharmaceutical (SNS) Point of Dispensing (SNS POD)
2) SPECIAL FACILITIES NOTIFICATION LIST
a) Utilities/Public Works
b) Park House Nursing Homes
c) Personal Care Homes
d) Group Homes
e) Child Care Centers/Homes
f) Schools
g) Camps
3) BUSINESSES
a) Greater Philadelphia Expo Center
a) Pharmaceutical Companies
Comment [P3]: This section has not been
approved.
Comment [LK4]: I’m pretty sure Parkhouse is all
one word
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 33 of 70
C. The municipality is subject to a variety of hazards. The most probable and damaging of these are:
1) Civil Disturbance
2) Dam Failure
3) Drought
4) Earthquake
5) Environmental Hazards
6) Extreme Temperature
7) Flash Flood
8) Flood
9) Hailstorm
10) Hurricane
11) Ice Jam
12) Lightning Strike
13) Nor'easter
14) Nuclear Incident
15) Pandemic
16) Radon Exposure
17) Subsidence, Sinkhole
18) Terrorism
19) Tornado & Wind Storm
20) Transportation Accident
21) Tropical Storm
22) Urban Fire and Explosion
23) Utility Interruption
24) Wildfire
25) Winter Storm
D. Historically, certain geographic areas of the Township of Upper Providence are more vulnerable to the
effects of these hazards.
E. Adjacent municipalities and other agencies will render assistance in accordance with the provisions of
written intergovernmental and mutual aid support agreements in place at the time of the emergency.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 34 of 70
F. When municipal resources are fully committed, and mutual aid from surrounding jurisdictions is
exhausted, the Montgomery County Emergency Management Agency (MCEMA) is available to coordinate
assistance and help satisfy any unmet needs. Similarly, if the county requires additional assistance, mutual
aid from adjacent counties, its Regional Task Force (RTF), or from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Ultimately, the Commonwealth can ask the Federal Government for assistance in dealing with a major
disaster or emergency.
G. In the event of an evacuation of the municipality or any part thereof, the majority of the evacuees will
utilize their own transportation resources. Additionally, those with pets, companion or service animals will
transport their own pets, and animals. Those with livestock or other farm animals will take appropriate
measures to safeguard the animals via sheltering or evacuation as appropriate.
H. Special facilities will develop, coordinate, and furnish emergency plans to the emergency management
organization of this municipality, the county, state departments and agencies as applicable and required by
codes, laws, regulations or requirements.
I. Any regulated facility, Superfund Amendments, and Re-Authorization Act (SARA) site, power plant, etc.
posing a specific hazard will develop, coordinate and furnish emergency plans and procedures to local,
county, state departments and agencies as applicable and required by codes, laws, regulations or
requirements.
J. Whenever warranted, the elected officials will declare an emergency for the municipality in accordance
with the provisions of the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Services Code (35Pa CS, § 7501). In like
manner, in the event of any emergency requiring protective actions (evacuation or sheltering), the elected
officials or designee will make the recommendation and communicate the information to the populace by
appropriate means including the Emergency Alert System (EAS), Route Alerting, or other technologies.
K. In the event of an evacuation, segments of the population will need to be transported from the identified
affected area(s) to safe havens. Depending upon the hazard factors, the host areas may be located within or
outside the municipality.
L. Emergency shelters will be activated by the MCEMA using public schools or public colleges/ universities
(per the provisions of the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Services Code) or other designated
shelters. Shelters will be operated by Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD) such as the
American Red Cross. Shelter operators will provide basic necessities including food, clothing, lodging,
basic medical care, and maintain a registration of those housed in the shelter.
M. Critical facilities such as extended care facilities should have some level of emergency power and alternate
energy sources available to accommodate for situations involving the loss of commercial power or other
energy sources.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 35 of 70
III. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS AND
CONTINUITY OF GOVERNMENT
A. The community’s elected officials are responsible for the protection of the lives, and property of the
citizens. They exercise primary supervision and control over the four phases (prevention, preparedness,
response, and recovery) of emergency management activities within the municipality.
B. A local Emergency Management Coordinator (EMC) shall act on behalf of the elected officials. An EOC
has been designated by the municipality, and may be activated by the EMC or the elected officials during
an emergency. A Deputy EMC and Alternate EOC have been designated to function in the event the
primary EMC and/or EOC are not available.
C. This plan embraces an “all-hazards” principle: with the understanding that most emergency response
functions are similar, regardless of the hazard. The EMC will mobilize resources and personnel as required
by the emergency situation.
D. The EMC and elected officials will develop mutual aid agreements with adjacent municipalities for
reciprocal emergency assistance as needed.
E. The municipality will embrace and utilize the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the
Incident Command System (see page 14).
1) ICS will be implemented immediately at the incident site, and state responders providing support will
cooperate under the direction of the Incident Commander.
2) Depending on the magnitude and severity of an incident, only certain Emergency Support Functions
(ESFs) may be needed. Accordingly, only those state agencies responsible for that function need to
report to the EOC.
a) A manageable span of control (3 to 7 staff; optimum is 5).
b) Personnel accountability (each person reports to only one person in the chain of command); and
c) Functional positions staffed when needed (responsibilities for any positions that are not staffed
remain with the next higher filled position).
F. When the Township of Upper Providence EOC is activated, the EMC or designee will coordinate between
the site incident command and MCEMA. To ensure consistency with operations at the incident site, the
EOC will also follow an incident command structure. The EMC will assume the role of EOC Manager and
initially, all of the remaining roles. As additional staff arrives at the EOC, the EMC may delegate positions
to them.
G. Availability of staff and operational needs may allow or require positions to be combined, or positions to
not be filled (responsibilities held by the next higher position.)
H. Continuity of government procedures specified in the Elected Officials checklist.
I. When the EMC receives notice of a potential emergency from the federal Homeland Security Advisory
System, from the National Weather Service watches and warnings, or from other reliable sources, partial
activation of the EOC in preparation for the emergency will be considered.
Comment [P5]: This section has not been
approved.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 36 of 70
J. Communication, Alert, and Warning will be provided to the public via the EAS. Other systems will be
utilized as available.
K. During non-emergency times, information regarding emergency plans, and actions to be taken by the
public, in the form of public information and education materials, will be provided to the public via
municipal newsletters, brochures, Township of Upper Providence web-sites, etc.
L. In the event of an evacuation, a majority of the population of the Township of Upper Providence will
evacuate using their own vehicles, or be transported from the identified affected area(s) to safe havens.
Depending upon the hazard factors, the affected areas may be located within or outside the municipality.
M. Evacuees are expected to follow the direction, and guidance of emergency workers, and other assigned
emergency officials. Pre-designated evacuation routes will be utilized, whenever safe and practical.
Critical intersections will be staffed by traffic control personnel to facilitate an orderly flow of traffic.
N. Emergency workers should complete pre-emergency “family plans” addressing such issues as
transportation and evacuation locations for immediate family members (Spouse and children).
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 37 of 70
IV. ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Sample ICS structure:
PIO Safety
Liaison
Operations Planning Logistics Finance
INCIDENT COMMANDER
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 38 of 70
A. COMMAND
The act of directing, ordering or controlling by explicit statutory, regulatory, or delegated authority.
B. OPERATIONS SECTION
Responsible for ensuring the accomplishment of responsibilities of all assigned branches. Section Chief may
retain branch director responsibilities, or delegate them, depending on the situation and availability of
personnel. Section Chief coordinates work assignments of the branch director(s) and reports to the EOC
manager on the progress and status of assigned missions.
C. PLANNING SECTION (EMC or as delegated)
Responsible for ensuring the accomplishment of the Emergency Management Branch responsibilities. Section
Chief may retain branch director responsibilities, or delegate them, depending on the situation and availability
of personnel. Section Chief coordinates work assignments to the branch director(s) and reports to the EOC
manager on the progress and status of assigned missions.
D. LOGISTICS SECTION
Responsible for ensuring the accomplishment of responsibilities of all assigned branches. Section Chief may
retain branch director responsibilities, or delegate them, depending on the situation and availability of
personnel. Section Chief coordinates work assignments to the branch director(s) and reports to the EOC
manager on the progress and status of assigned missions. Logistics Section also provides internal logistical
support for the EOC itself.
E. FINANCE and ADMINISTRATION SECTION
Responsible for ensuring the accomplishment of responsibilities of Long Term Recovery and Mitigation
Branch. Section Chief may retain branch director responsibilities, or delegate them, depending on the situation
and availability of personnel. Section Chief coordinates work assignments of the branch director(s) and reports
to the EOC manager on the progress and status of assigned missions. The section also maintains finance and
personnel records of response activities.
Comment [P6]: This section has not been
approved.
Comment [P7]: This section has not been
approved.
Comment [P8]: This section has not been
approved.
Comment [P9]: This section has not been
approved.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 39 of 70
Non-Emergency/Normal Operations
1) Identify actions that are implemented during non-emergency or disaster periods that will prepare the
locality for a potential emergency response if necessary.
2) Examples to include, but are not limited to:
a) Public information and educational materials will be provided to the public via municipal newsletters,
brochures, publications in telephone directories, municipal websites, and other media.
b) Assure the viability and accuracy of emergency contact lists, resource lists, and emergency contracts.
c) Ensure that special needs registries, to the jurisdiction, are identified, and policies are developed to
contact individuals.
Response Operations
1) Identify actions that the jurisdiction will take during a response to an emergency or incident.
2) Examples to include, but are not limited to:
a) Suspend daily functions of the government that does not contribute directly to the emergency operation.
b) Redirect efforts and resources to accomplish emergency tasks.
c) Implement evacuation orders as needed.
d) Open and staff emergency shelters as needed.
e) Open and establish medical surge facilities to accommodate large numbers of patients when hospital
facilities are overwhelmed.
Recovery Actions
1) Identify actions the jurisdiction will take to recover and restore to normal operations after an emergency
or disaster.
2) Identify actions that jurisdiction will take after the initial response has been implemented and assist
individuals and communities in returning to a normal state as much as feasible.
3) Identify the range of recovery actions that the jurisdiction may implement based on the impact of the
disaster, local capabilities, and the availability of resources.
4) Examples to include, but are not limited to:
a) Within 72 hours of impact, complete an Initial Damage Assessment and submit to the Montgomery
County EOC.
b) Assess local infrastructures and determine viability for re-entry of residents.
c) Begin immediate repairs to infrastructures.
Mitigation Actions
1) Identify actions the jurisdiction will take to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property from
hazards and their side effects.
2) Examples to include but, are not limited to:
a) Participate in grant programs for loss reduction measures (if available).
b) Coordinate federal flood insurance operations and integration of mitigation with other program efforts.
c) Ensure early documentation of losses avoided due to previous hazard mitigation measures.
d) Review the All-Hazard Mitigation Plan and update as necessary with any mitigation actions that could
prevent similar impacts in the event of a future disaster.
e) Work with the Montgomery County Department of Emergency Management Mitigation Program to
develop mitigation grant projects to assist in areas most at risk.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 40 of 70
F. ROLES and RESPONSIBILITIES
A successful local emergency management program involves local government officials, local government
agencies, the private sector, and non-profit organizations.
Elected Officials
1) Protect the lives and property of citizens;
2) Establish the local emergency management program;
3) Appoint the local emergency management staff;
4) Adopt the EOP.
Emergency Management
1) Determines the need to evacuate an endangered area;
2) Exercises direction and coordination from the EOC during disaster operations; and
3) Holds overall responsibility for maintaining and updating the plan.
Coordinator of Emergency Management
1) Develops and maintains the EOP;
2) Ensures the local EOC is in a constant state of readiness;
3) Assumes certain duties in the absence of the director of emergency management; and
4) Ensures that the EOP is reviewed, revised, and adopted every two years.
Local Government Agencies
1) Develop and maintain detailed emergency plans and standard operating procedures (SOPs);
2) Identify sources of emergency supplies, equipment and transportation;
3) Negotiate and maintain mutual aid agreements, which are identified in the plan;
4) Maintain records of disaster related expenditures, including appropriate documentation;
5) Protect and preserve vital records essential for the continuity of government and delivery of essential
functions, as well as establish and maintain a list of succession of key personnel.
Responsibilities may include:
1) Planning for personal and business disaster preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery;
2) Having knowledge of local emergency response plans and procedures; and
3) Implementing any protective actions required or requested by the emergency manager.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 41 of 70
V. TRAINING AND EXERCISES
A. Training Authority
1) For training purposes and exercises, the MCEMC may activate this plan as required to evaluate and
maintain the readiness posture of the municipality.
2) Title 35 stipulates certain training requirements for Emergency Services personnel in local
governments. In general, the required training may be obtained through the Township of Upper
Providence Emergency Management Agency (TUPEMA), FEMA, and/or PEMA.
B. Exercise Requirements
1) To provide practical, controlled operations experience for those who have EOC responsibilities, the
EMC should activate this plan at least every three years in the form of an emergency exercise.
C. Training Policy
1) PUBLIC OFFICIALS:
a) Response and Recovery Training: Training programs will be provided to municipal officials, the
emergency management coordinator, EOC staff and emergency services personnel (police, fire,
and EMS) on the procedures and policies for a coordinated response and recovery to a disaster
emergency. Training programs are offered by PEMA and coordinated by the MCEMA.
b) Professional Development: Training programs will be provided to the municipal TUPEMA and
staff in skills and techniques of writing plans, professional development skills, and national
security issues related to municipal emergency preparedness. Training programs are offered by
PEMA and coordinated by the MCEMA.
c) Damage Assessment and Reporting: Annual training will be offered in damage reporting
procedures, and in damage assessment for those who will work with county damage assessment
teams. Training programs are offered by the PEMA and coordinated by the MCEMA.
2) EMERGENCY SERVICES AND OTHER RESPONDING AGENCIES:
a) Exercises, as indicated above, will be used as a training technique for public officials, county
emergency staff, and emergency services personnel who are assigned emergency responsibilities
in this plan. TUPEMA staff officers responsible for functional annexes are tasked with ensuring
skills training for personnel who implement the provisions of their respective annexes.
3) STATE AND FEDERAL TRAINING:
a) TUPEMA staff will participate in State and Federal training programs as prescribed internally and
by PEMA.
Comment [P10]: This section has not been
approved.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 42 of 70
VI. ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISTICS
A. Local governments will submit situation reports, requests for assistance and damage assessment reports to
the MCEMA.
B. The MCEMA will forward reports and requests for assistance to PEMA.
C. Municipal and county governments will utilize pre-established bookkeeping and accounting methods to
track and maintain records of expenditures and obligations.
D. Narrative and written log-type records of response actions will be kept by the municipal emergency
management agency. The logs and records will form the basis for status reports to the County and PEMA.
E. TUPEMA will make reports to the County by the most practical means and in a timely manner.
F. All written records, reports, and other documents will follow the principles of NIMS.
G. When municipal resources are committed, and mutual aid is exhausted, the MCEMA is available to
coordinate assistance and satisfy any unmet needs. Similarly, if the County requires additional assistance,
it will call on mutual aid from adjacent counties, its RTF, or from the PEMA. Ultimately, PEMA will turn
to FEMA for assistance in dealing with a major disaster or emergency.
Comment [P11]: This section has not been
approved.
Comment [LK12]: Changed “the local EMA” to
“TUPEMA”
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 43 of 70
VII. PLAN REQUIREMENTS, MAINTENANCE
AND DISTRIBUTION
A. EMC Responsibilities: The municipal EOP is the responsibility of the elected officials, but normally the
EMC will coordinate development and maintenance of the plan. The plan components will be reviewed
and updated by the EMC every two years or as needed. Some incident specific annexes require an annual
review based upon legislation or regulation. Whenever portions of this plan are implemented in an
emergency event or exercise, a review will be conducted to determine necessary changes.
B. Enforceability: This plan is enforceable under the provisions of the Pennsylvania Emergency
Management Services Code.
C. Execution: This plan will be executed upon order of the Township of Upper Providence Elected Officials
or their authorized representative, the Municipal Emergency Management Coordinator.
D. Distribution: This plan and its supporting materials are controlled documents. While the distribution of the
“Basic Plan” is allowable, the Checklists, Notification, and Resource Manual and some Incident Specific
Plans contain specific responses or personal information that are not considered to be available to the
public. Copies of this plan are distributed according to an approved control list based upon regulatory or
functional “need to know”. A record of distribution, by copy number, is maintained on file by the EMC.
Controlled copies of revisions will be distributed to designated plan holders. Revisions or changes are
documented by means of the “Record of Changes” page 5. A receipt system will be used to verify the
process.
Comment [P13]: This section has not been
approved.
Comment [LK14]: Italicized because they were
section titles. Not sure if they’re supposed to be
italicized or quoted
Comment [LK15]: Changed “response” to
“responses”
Comment [LK16]: Added “that”
Comment [LK17]: Changed “Distribution is
based upon regulatory or functional “need to know”.
Copies of this plan are distributed according to an
approved control list.”
Comment [LK18]:
Comment [LK19]: The wording in this sentence
kind of sounds a little awkward to me but its not a
big deal.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 44 of 70
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A - AUTHORITIES AND REFERENCES
1. The Pennsylvania Emergency Management Services Code 35 Pa. C.S. Section 7101-7707, as amended
2. Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, “Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Multi-Hazard
Identification and Risk Assessment,” as amended
3. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Emergency Operations Plan, May 2005, with amendments
4. Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, Emergency Management Directive 2002-5,
(Requirements for the Preparation, Review, and update of municipal EOPs and accompanying
Documents)
5. County Emergency Operations Plan
6. County Hazard Vulnerability Analysis
7. County Hazard Mitigation Plan
Federal
The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law
93-288, as amended
The Homeland Security Act of 2002
National Response Framework
Developing and Maintaining Emergency Operations Plans; Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 101 v.2
Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010
Comment [P20]: This section has not been
approved.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 45 of 70
APPENDIX B - DEFINITIONS AND GLOSSARY
Access Control Points (ACP) - Posts established primarily by State or municipal police and augmented as
necessary by the National Guard on roads leading into a disaster area for the purpose of controlling entry
during an emergency.
Activate - To start or place into action an activity or system.
Command Section - One of the five functional areas of the Incident Command System. The function of
command is to direct, control, or order resources, including people and equipment, to the best possible
advantage.
Command Post - That location at which primary command functions are executed; usually co-located with the
Incident Base also referred to as the Incident Command Post.
Control - To exercise authority with the ability to influence actions, compel or hold in restraint. (For use in
context with this document: (35 PA C.S.) as amended clarifies and strengthens the role of the Governor by
granting him authority to issue executive orders and disaster proclamations which have the force and effect of
law when dealing with emergency and disaster situations and controlling operations.)
Coordination - Arranging in order, activities of equal importance to harmonize in a common effort. (For use in
context with this document: authorizing and/or providing for coordination of activities relating to emergency
disaster prevention, preparedness, response and recovery by State, local governments, and Federal agencies.)
Decontamination
The process of making people, objects, or areas safe by absorbing, destroying, neutralizing, making harmless,
or removing the Hazardous Materials/HAZMAT.
Deploy - To move to the assigned location in order to start operations.
Direction - Providing authoritative guidance, supervision and management of activities/operations along a
prescribed course to reach an attainable goal.
Disaster - A natural or human-caused event that has a large-scale adverse effect on individuals, the
environment, the economy or property.
Human Caused Disaster - Any industrial, nuclear or transportation accident, explosion, conflagration, power
failure, natural resource shortage or other condition, resulting from human causes, whether unintended or
deliberate. This includes oil spills and other injurious environmental contamination, terrorism acts of
vandalism or sabotage and civil unrest which threaten or cause substantial damage to property, human
suffering, hardship or loss of life.
Natural Disaster - Any hurricane, tornado, storm, flood, high water, wind-driven water, tidal wave, earthquake,
landslide, mudslide, snowstorm, drought, fire, explosion or another catastrophe which results in substantial
damage to property, hardship, suffering or possible loss of life.
Comment [P21]: This section has not been
approved.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 46 of 70
Disaster Emergency - Those conditions which upon investigation may be found, actually or likely to:
Seriously affect the safety, health or welfare of a substantial number of citizens of the municipality or preclude
the operation or use of essential public facilities.
Be of such magnitude or severity as to render essential state supplementation of regional, county and municipal
efforts or resources exerted or utilized in alleviating the danger, damage, suffering or hardship faced.
Have been caused by forces beyond the control of humans, by reason of civil disorder, riot, natural occurrence,
terrorism or disturbance, or by factors not foreseen and not known to exist when appropriation bills were
enacted.
Emergency Alert System (EAS) - An automatic system where radio station operators voluntarily broadcast
emergency information. The system can be activated by county, state or federal emergency management
agencies or the national weather service.
Emergency Management - The judicious planning, assignment, and coordination of all available resources in
an integrated program of prevention, preparedness, response and recovery for emergencies of all kinds.
Emergency Operations Center - A facility from which government directs and controls its emergency
operations; where information about the status of the emergency situation is officially collected, assimilated,
and reported on; where coordination among response agencies takes place; and from which outside assistance
is officially requested.
Emergency Services - The preparation for and the carrying out of functions, other than those for which military
forces are primarily responsible, to prevent, minimize and provide emergency repair of injury and damage
resulting from a disaster, together with all other activities necessary or incidental to the preparation for and
carrying out of those functions. The functions include, without limitation, firefighting services, police
services, medical and health services, search, rescue, engineering, disaster warning services, communications,
radiological, shelter, chemical and other special weapons defense, evacuation of persons from stricken areas,
emergency welfare services, emergency transportation, emergency resources management, existing or properly
assigned functions of plant protection, temporary restoration of public utility services and other functions
related to civilian protection.
Emergency Support Function (ESF) – A distinct function that may need to be performed during emergency
response, but which is not necessarily dependent on the type of disaster or emergency that causes the need for
the support function. ESFs define an organizational structure for the support, resources, program
implementation, and services that are most likely to be needed to save lives, protect property and the
environment, restore essential services and critical infrastructure, and help victims and communities return to
normal. Use of ESFs allows for planning, training and organization to be made without consideration for the
cause. This plan uses fifteen separate ESFs that are mirrored in the National Response Plan and the
Pennsylvania State EOP.
Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) - An active U.S. Army organization tasked with the retrieval and disposal
of military ordnance. Also available to assist civilian authorities in life threatening situations dealing with
explosive devices when civilian explosive technicians or bomb squads are not available.
External Affairs – Those emergency activities that deal with the general public and other entities outside the
immediate disaster area. This includes public information and media relations activities.
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 47 of 70
Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan - The plan was developed in response to the requirements of
Section 303 (a) of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III) of Superfund
Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. It is intended to be a tool for our community’s use in
recognizing the risks of a hazardous materials release, in evaluating our preparedness for such an event, and in
planning our response and recovery actions. This plan is separate from the county’s Emergency Operations
Plan.
Incident Command System - A model for disaster response that uses common terminology, modular
organization, integrated communications, unified command structure, action planning, manageable span of
control, pre-designed facilities, and comprehensive resource management. In ICS, there are five functional
elements: Command, Operations, Logistics, Planning and Finance/Administration.
Incident Commander - The individual responsible for the management of all incident operations.
Governor's Proclamation of "Disaster Emergency" – A formal declaration or proclamation by the Governor of
Pennsylvania that a disaster has occurred or that the occurrence or the threat of a disaster is imminent. As part
of this proclamation, the Governor may waive or set aside time-consuming procedures and formalities
prescribed by state law (excepting mandatory constitutional requirements.) The state of disaster emergency
continues until the Governor finds that the danger has passed and terminates it by executive order or
proclamation, but no state of disaster emergency may continue for longer than 90 days unless renewed by the
Governor.
Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) - Any substance or material in a quantity or form which may be harmful or
injurious to humans, domestic animals, wildlife, economic crops or property when released into the
environment. Hazardous materials are classified as chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive.
Hazards Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) - A compilation of natural and human-caused hazards and their
predictability, frequency, duration, intensity and risk to population and property.
Initial Damage Assessment Report - A report that provides information regarding overall damage to public and
private property, thereby providing a basis for an emergency declaration and/or disaster assistance.
Integrated Communications Plan - This plan coordinates the use of available communications means and
establishes frequency assignments for certain functions.
Joint Information Center (JIC) - A facility established to coordinate all incident-related public information
activities. It is the central point of contact for all news media at the scene of the incident. Public information
officials from all participating agencies should co-locate at the JIC.
Local Emergency - The condition declared by the local governing body when, in its judgment, the threat or
actual occurrence of a disaster requires focused local government action to prevent or alleviate the damage,
loss, hardship or suffering threatened or caused. A local emergency arising wholly or substantially out of a
resource shortage may be declared only by the Governor, upon petition of the local governing body.
Mitigation
Activities that eliminate or reduce the chance occurrence or the effects of a disaster. Examples of mitigation
measures include, but are not limited to, the development of zoning laws and land use ordinances, State
April 2, 2018 BOS Meeting Page 48 of 70
building code provisions, regulations and licensing for handling and storage of hazardous materials, and the
inspection and enforcement of such ordinances, codes, and regulations.
Mutual Aid Agreement - A written agreement between agencies and/or jurisdictions in which they agree to
assist one another, upon request, by furnishing personnel and/or equipment in an emergency situation.
Mass Care Centers - Fixed facilities that provide emergency lodging and essential social services for victims of
disaster left temporarily homeless. Feeding may be done within a mass care center (in suitable dining
facilities) or nearby.
Municipality - As defined in the Pennsylvania Constitution, “...a county, city, b

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